Unlisted Buildings

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‘Mosaic wall’ east side of The Croft

Community

Five mosaic panels in moulded brick frames, set into the wall next to Croft Cottage ( actually the garden wall of 20 New Street). Naive but contributing to the variety and interest of the scene. Local legend that they were made by an elderly man who lived in No 20 in late 19thC and, along with his dog, died in a house fire there.

Acton Square 11

Commercial

Of local historical importance - a former silk factory built c1870 and occupied at different times by three of the silk manufacturers located in Sudbury today. "W" on gable to attached managers /foreman's house on left indicates that it was originally built by Stephen Walters and Company. Uses in the mid 20thC include serving as St Gregory's parish rooms and then Sidney Aperious's second hand warehouse.

Acton Square 2 (flats 1-3)

Residential

An impressive c1980's development with a narrow frontage which fits seamlessly into the north side of the Square alongside the Victorian Nos 3-6. Blank brick arches on first floor echo the neighbouring arched doorways. Rear courtyard entered from Croft Road. Designed by local architect James Blackie

Acton Square 3-6

Residential

Mid-19th century terrace of white brick cottages. They have a simplicity and quiet dignity. Note the curved corner brickwork at east end to reduce the risk of waggon damage and large g/f window to No 3 - formerly a butcher's shop. Group value.

Acton Square 8-10

Residential

A short mid Victorian terrace. with crisp brick detailing to string course, doorways and windows using Norman motifs. Group value although rather reduced by the installation of heavy-section upvc windows to No 9.

Burkitts Lane 21-22

Residential

Attractive pair of two storey mid 19th century houses with additional basements at pavement level giving an almost metropolitan feel. Semicircular door arches above simple fanlights. Nice touches to the brickwork, chamfered around the doors and windows. Cast iron lintels above windows, original chimney pots. Walls of Ballingdon whites - one with the natural patina cleaned off which rather detracts from the overall impact of the pair.

Burkitts Lane 9-12

Residential

Nos 9-11 are three Victorian cottages c1880. Rendered brick well proportioned and retaining some original features such as sashes and foot scrapers. No 12 was a separate build originally. It has been sensitively restored and the four are included for their group value.

Church Walk 1

Residential

Sits on the west side of Acton Square! A highly idiosyncratic building which adds interest and colour to the local townscape. Also of historic interest - built c1891 as offices for Arthur Grimwood who was the architect for Grimwood the builders. Was the mix of different design elements and materials to show off what they could provide for customers. See p525 The Buildings of England Suffolk West, Bettley and Pevsner, 2015.

Church Walk 2-4

Residential

Simple row of white brick cottages, apparently mid-Victorian but the steep pitch of the pegtiled roof and internal stud work and plaster walls suggest earlier buildings, refronted in the 19thC,

Church Walk 6 Vine Cottage

Residential

Opposite the Waggon and Horses PH in Sudbury. An attractive small timber-framed cottage with the mansard roof giving extra headroom on the first floor. Probably 17th/early 18thC in origin but, surprisingly, not listed. The recent addition of solar panels strikes an intrusive note.

Church Walk Phoenix Court wall

Residential

A 19thC brick wall separating Phoenix Court from Church Walk. In summer virginia creeper almost hides the plaque commemorating the fire which destroyed Grimwood's timber yard in 1890. The Grimwood family built the Phoenix Brewery on the vacant site; post WWII it was the site of an egg packing station and now the modern Phoenix Court development. Included for its historic and visual interest.

Church Walk Waggon and Horses public house

Commercial

The peg tiled house at the heart of the buildings is possibly 18thC. The double doorway and small window panes on the Church Walk frontage have an early 19th century look. Shadrach Clover was the innkeeper in 1844 then Grimwood ownership into the early 20thC when they built the Phoenix Brewery next door. Good range of red brick stables/outbuildings along rear courtyard to Croft Road.

Croft Road 1-4

Residential

1-4 Gardenside was designed by Arthur Grimwood and built by the family firm in 1896. He drew inspiration from the English vernacular style with features such tile hanging and half timbered gables. Mentioned in The Buildings of England, Suffolk West, Bettley and Pevsner 2015.

Crofton House

Community

Large red brick house c1900? occupying the corner opposite the Dental Surgery at the entrance to Gainsborough Road. Significant for the various uses in the 20thC - housing evacuees and serving as an ARP post in WWII and then a Suffolk CC children's home 1945-1962. Currently owned by a housing association - a home to single men who were either homeless or unsuitably housed.

Gaol Lane 21 Studio 56 The Coach House

Commercial

One of a group of warehouses built by R.S.Joy to serve his furnishing, furnishing and removal business and later taken over by P.S.Head in 1919. All have character and contribute to the interesting mix of the local townscape. No 21 The Coach House is an imposing two storey red brick building c1885 with a single storey lean-to waggon shed and stable at the side.

Gaol Lane 21A Flats 1-3 Coach House Court

Residential

Another of R. S. Joy's warehouses, built in 1903 - see the plaque on the west side facing onto Old Market Court, Burkitts Lane. Known as the 'White Elephant' in Mr Head's time because of his problems finding a use for it. Both brick elevations, red and white, are rather severe but quite impressive. Has had many uses over the years including an Antiques Warehouse.

Gaol Lane 23 Weston’s Bakery

Commercial

The third of R.S Joy's warehouses, built in 1899. A long, narrow, redbrick and slate roofed building. It still retains its original frontage to Gaol Lane with attached pilasters and doors wide enough to admit a horse drawn removal van. It has been put to various uses in modern times and is now a very popular bakery and cafe.

Gaol Lane 25-39

Residential

Similar rows of workers' cottages exist elsewhere in the town but substantially altered by replacement windows and doors. Here, the use of contrasting red brick for the lintels, the unifying role played by the string course and the fact that the whole terrace is still relatively intact allows it to be included for group value.

Gaol Lane 47-49

Residential

A pair of semi detached cottages c1840. No 47 still with many original features and considerable visual appeal. No 49 recently renovated with the removal of the accumulated patina of 150 years from the brickwork and new UPVC sashes. Still retain their Local Listing but they no longer work as a pair.

Gaol Lane Wall to Siam Gardens

Community

Siam House, the Victorian home of Ellistons the builders, was demolished in the 1970s but its garden wall survives - an attractive mix of flint and brick. It now encircles 'Weavers Piece', a garden with information boards on the history of the local textile industry.

Hales House The Croft

Residential

Substantial white brick house, occupying a secluded position on the corner with Beaconsfield Road and well shielded by its walls and gardens. Appears to date from about i850 with many of its original features.

Inkerman Row Playford Court

Community

Designed by Babergh architect Chris Chestnut in the late 1970s to replace the former terrace of weavers' cottages. Makes reference to the white and contrasting red brick detailing seen elsewhere in the town on mid Victorian buildings but still clearly a late 20thC building. The curved brick walls framing the entrance are a nice touch.

Market Hill 9 Black Boy stables

Commercial

Former stables lying behind the old Black Boy coaching inn on Market Hill but also accessible from Burkitts Lane. Mid -19th century. Pantiles roof, timber framing with mixture of brick and weather board cladding. Inside the brick floor at the entrance worn down by the passage of horses and some original horse stalls. The structure is unused and in a state of dilapidation. It still has historic value and, restored and put to a new use, it could continue to adding variety and interest to the townscape.

The Croft 1 Northcroft Social club

Community

This began as a private house. By 1875 Charles Wright, crayon manufacturer, was living there and had built his factory behind along the return frontage to Croft Road. In the 20thC it housed the Liberal Club and then the British Legion. Local historical interest.

The Croft 2

Residential

Nos 2-5 The Croft have considerable group value with their variations in width, height and roof pitch and their location. No 2 is a well proportioned, mid-Victorian, double fronted, white brick and slate property, its character retained in a recent restoration. The home of Kathleen Grimwood for many years.

The Croft 3

Residential

Nos 2-5 The Croft have considerable group value with their variations in width, height and roof pitch and their location. No 3 occupies a narrow frontage; white brick with a shallow pitched slate roof. Looks 19C but possibly an earlier core behind the facade.

The Croft 4

Residential

Nos 2-5 The Croft have considerable group value with their variations in width, height and roof pitch and their situation facing out across the green. No 4 occupies a narrow frontage. The white brick facade with Victorian sashes projects slightly forward of the building line of its neighbours, suggesting a 19thC addition to an earlier timber-framed core which still retains its steeply pitched peg-tile roof.

The Croft 5 St Anne’s

Residential

Nos 2-5 The Croft have considerable group value with their variations in width, height and roof pitch. No 5 is probably early 19thC, double fronted and well proportioned with a quiet dignity; clearly, a higher status property than its neighbours. Stands on the site of the ancient "pie powder" court which sought to regulate the annual fairs on The Croft. Early 20thC it was the home of George Grimwood, lessee of the Quay Lane Gas Works.

The Old Bathing Place The Croft

Community

The Old Bathing Place was opened on the river in 1898 and was in use until the late 1930s when it was closed after an outbreak of diphtheria in the town. There are steps for the bathers to descend into a semi-circular section for non-swimmers which divided by an iron rails from the deep water. Once they could swim they could go out further - there are also steps on the opposite bank. Local historical significance - generations of Sudburians used this bathing place.